London Borough of Croydon

Welcome to our celebration of 100 years of council housing in Croydon. This year marks 100 years since the Housing Act, which in 1919 gave rise to widespread building of council housing across the UK and including the London Borough of Croydon.  100 Years Poster

To celebrate this centenary, Croydon Council wants people’s stories, films and other memorabilia for a commemorative exhibition at the town hall where historical documents and photographs from council and library archives, and personal contributions from people who have lived in a Croydon council house, will be on display. These could be family memories such as moving into a council property or snippets of everyday life on one of Croydon's estates. Or it could be more historic events such as memories of war time in the Borough or a national celebration. Your stories are Croydon's history.

If you have treasured memories, stories you’d like to share or know someone that would, we’d love to hear from you. Contact residentinvolvement@croydon.gov.uk or call us on 020 8726 6100 ext 47350.

The exhibition will be held at Croydon Clocktower followed by a tour in libraries across the borough.

Background

The end of the First World War in 1918 created a huge demand for working-class housing in towns throughout Britain and the Prime Minister at the time, David Lloyd George gave a speech in which he pledged “to make Britain a fit country for heroes to live in. Known as the Addison Act after the health minister who led the legislation, the 1919 Housing Act was the first step in nationwide provision of good-quality council homes. It was followed by two more Acts that heralded the construction of many more homes, including replacements for slum dwellings and households bombed out during the Second World War.

It made housing a national responsibility and local authorities were given the task of developing new housing and rented accommodation where it was needed by working people, fulfilling the prime minister’s promise to provide ‘Homes fit for heroes.’